Solid Edge

Open Large Solid Edge Assemblies Quickly

29 Jan, 2011 By: Russell Brook

On the Edge Solid Edge Tutorial: Assembly overrides and display configurations can save you time by limiting the number of components or level of detail displayed.


Editor's Note: This tutorial courtesy of Siemens PLM Software.

In most 3D CAD systems, opening large assemblies poses its own set of challenges, such as memory management and display performance. Fortunately, Solid Edge has many large assembly tools built-in, so you can work with large amounts of data easily. In this tutorial, I'll discuss some tips that will save you time and frustration.

Assembly Overrides

While you may need to open a top-level assembly, you may not need to display the whole assembly or see all the component detailing. Solid Edge allows you to open parts using assembly overrides, which effect how geometry is loaded into the software. Assembly activation overrides let you choose whether parts are hidden, active, or inactive, and either simplified or as designed.
 

Using assembly overrides when opening assemblies loads the whole assembly structure, but reduces load time by only displaying the components you are immediately interested in. 


Hide All Components: This option is very efficient, and the assembly structure is loaded into Solid Edge very quickly, but no components are displayed. Parts and sub-assemblies can be displayed and activated as required using the pathfinder.

Apply Activation Override to Parts: Specifies how you want to open an assembly (ASM file). When this option is set, you can specify whether the parts in the assembly are active or inactive. When this option is cleared, the active or inactive status of the parts is determined by the last save. The assembly opens faster when you open it with parts inactive.

Activate All: Specifies that all parts in the assembly are active when you open the assembly. This option is set when you enable Apprentice Mode on the Solid Edge startup screen.

Inactivate All: Specifies that all parts in the assembly are inactive when you open the assembly. In some cases, parts that have associative links to other parts will still be activated when you open the assembly. For example, parts with inter-part links, adjustable parts, flexible pipes, fastener systems, and so forth may be activated to ensure that the linked geometry is up-to-date. This typically occurs when a part is modified outside the context of the assembly, and that part is a parent in an associative operation. When the assembly containing the child part is opened, the child part must be activated to update the link information properly.

Apply Simplify Override to Parts: Allows you to specify how you want to open an assembly that contains simplified parts. When this option is set, you can specify whether the parts in the assembly are displayed using the simplified or designed version. When this option is cleared, the simplified or designed status of the parts is determined by the last save. When you open an assembly with parts simplified, the assembly will open faster. This option is available when opening an assembly document.

Use All Design: Specifies that all parts in the assembly that have simplified versions defined will be displayed as designed when you open the assembly.

Use All Simplified: Specifies that all parts in the assembly that have simplified versions defined will be displayed as simplified when you open the assembly.

Apply Simplify Override to Subassemblies: Allows you to specify how subassemblies are displayed when you open an assembly. When this option is set, you can specify whether the subassemblies in the assembly are displayed using the simplified or designed version. When this option is cleared, the simplified or designed status of the subassemblies is determined by the last save. When you open an assembly with subassemblies simplified, the assembly will open faster. This option is available when opening an assembly document. For more information, see Simplifying Assemblies.

Use All Design: Specifies that all subassemblies in the assembly will display using the designed version when the assembly is opened.
 


Use All Simplified: Specifies that all subassemblies in the assembly that have simplified versions defined will be displayed as simplified when you open the assembly.

Apply Simplified Assembly Override:
Allows you to specify how you want to apply the display configuration. When this option is set, you can specify whether the parts in the assembly are simplified or designed when you apply the display configuration. When this option is cleared, the simplified or designed status of the parts is determined by their status when the configuration was saved. This option is not available in the Teamcenter environment.

Top-Level Assembly: Specifies that all top-level assemblies that have simplified versions defined will be displayed as simplified when you open the assembly.

All Subassemblies: Specifies that all subassemblies in the assembly that have simplified versions defined will be displayed as simplified when you open the assembly.

Display Configurations


By limiting the components displayed to only those that you choose, display configurations save you time when opening large assemblies. 


Solid Edge also allows you to open parts using display configurations, which only display a predefined select set of parts. Because the whole assembly structure is loaded, you can navigate the assembly tree and toggle which components are displayed as you design without initially loading the whole assembly into memory, saving time and resources.

If you forget or don't choose a configuration while opening an assembly, you can press the Escape key anytime to stop the opening process. The complete assembly structure is loaded into the Pathfinder, but Solid Edge will only display the parts graphically that are loaded into the memory so far, so you can still select the parts you want to work on and display those parts by selecting them from the Pathfinder as needed.

To learn more tricks like these, visit www.solidedge.com/demos or read more Cadalyst Solid Edge tutorials. Until next time, good luck using Solid Edge.
 


About the Author: Russell Brook

Russell Brook

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