Cadalyst

CAD Tech News (#85)

3 May, 2018 By: Cadalyst Staff


▶ New KeyShot Viewer Supports Interactive Product Design Reviews

A new application from Luxion enables users to experience interactive visualizations without high-powered hardware — or a copy of KeyShot.

By Cadalyst Staff

Luxion is a developer of rendering and lighting technology best known for KeyShot, a real-time ray-tracing and global illumination program for 3D rendering and animation. On April 5, Luxion launched KeyShot 7.3 and KeyShot Viewer, a new, free, standalone application for macOS- and Windows-based KeyShot users — and anyone they collaborate with. "You don't need a regular version of KeyShot installed to run it, so anybody can literally download, install, and open up KeyShot Viewer," said Rex Roberts, UX design lead at Luxion.

Roberts demonstrated the new application on a computer powered by a dual 12-core Intel Xeon processor — but pointed out that it could have been a tablet instead. "KeyShot Viewer does not require a powerful machine to run on," he confirmed.

KeyShot Viewer is intended to facilitate design reviews, interactive presentations, and visual collaboration. It "can open any KeyShot package file for interactive viewing, presentation, and also configuration if the scene has been set up with it," explained Roberts. (This configuration setup is done in a wizard in KeyShot Pro.) A KeyShot package file (KSP) collects all the elements of a visualized scene — including custom materials, textures, and HDRI files — into one compressed file for easier sharing with collaborators or clients.

KeyShot Viewer, a touch-enabled desktop application available for Mac and Windows, enables KeyShot scenes to be securely shared with anyone for interactive viewing, presentation, and configuration. Image courtesy of Luxion.
KeyShot Viewer, a touch-enabled desktop application available for Mac and Windows, enables KeyShot scenes to be securely shared with anyone for interactive viewing, presentation, and configuration. Image courtesy of Luxion.

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▶ Step by Step, Robotics Team Overcomes Design Challenges of Walk-Assist Exoskeletons

Kyoungchul Kong's South Korean research team uses SOLIDWORKS to design wearable robots and quickly customize them for individual users.

By Cadalyst Staff

They may look like something from a science-fiction movie about a future populated by cyborgs, but powered exoskeletons — wearable robots that augment their users' physical abilities — have been around for more than 50 years. Back in 1965, GE began its Hardiman initiative, a joint Army–Navy project that sought to dramatically increase the amount of cargo, machinery, or ordnance that a human wearer could lift. According to GE, the 1,500-lb, 30-joint Hardiman prototype suffered from stability, reliability, and power supply problems, and walking speed was limited to less than two miles per hour.

A little more than a half-century later, robotic exoskeleton technology has advanced so much that it's enabling paraplegic users to walk again. "Suddenly, it is becoming real," said Kyoungchul Kong, a professor of mechanical engineering at Sogang University, South Korea, and the CEO and founder of SG Robotics.

Kong heads up a research team that comprises members from the Sogang Mechanical Engineering department, SG Robotics, and Yonsei Severance Rehabilitation Hospital. These collaborators are working together to develop wearable robots and ultimately, help people with disabilities live independently.

Kong discussed his team's work at the SOLIDWORKS World 2018 user conference, showcasing two of their powered exoskeletons. The WalkON suit is designed to help users with completely paralyzed legs walk; the ANGELEGS robot assists users whose walking ability is impaired by age or injury, helping them manage inclines, climb stairs, and cover longer distances.

The ANGELEGS wearable robot provides walking assistance without overriding the user's own motions.
The ANGELEGS wearable robot provides walking assistance without overriding the user's own motions.

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▶ WHAT’S NEW


CAD Manager Column: Spring into Standards, Part 3 — Take Action on Your New CAD Standards
You're off to a great start on revamping your company's CAD standards to make work processes more efficient — but how will you prioritize the implementation? Read more »

AutoCAD Video Tips: Create Smart Centerlines in AutoCAD
It's not uncommon to add centerlines while dimensioning — but are your centerlines smart? AutoCAD tipster Lynn Allen shows you the ins and outs of associative centerlines, and explains how to disassociate and reassociate them! Watch the video »

Cadalyst Updates Guide to Workstations on a Budget
The 2018 edition of "How to Choose a CAD Workstation on a Budget" provides advice on configurations that balance function with finances. Read more »

Cadalyst Publishes 2018 Guide to Freebies for CAD Users
Updated version of the popular guide, "Fabulous Freebies for CAD Users," helps readers find no-cost and low-cost tools and resources. Read more »


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